4 Great Teas from Hubei Province

A lot of attention is paid to the teas from the Yunnan Province, since many of them are made into pu-erhs. However, some fine teas come from the Hubei Province, and here are four of them.

First, a bit about the Hubei Province:

A province located in the central part of China. The name means “north of the lake,” since it is north of Lake Dongting. The capital of Hubei is Wuhan, a major transportation thoroughfare and the political, cultural, and economic hub of Central China. It borders several provinces, including Henan on the north, Anhui on the east, and Jiangxi on the southeast. Geographically, most of central and eastern portions of the province are made of the Jianghan Plain. There are mountains in the western part, including Wudang, Jingshan, Daba, and Wu Mountains. There are several tributaries of the Yangtze river in the province. One is the Shen Nong Stream named after the Emperor Shen Nong who, according to legend, had tea leaves fall into his pot of boiling water, drank the resulting liquid, and thus began the whole tea business. The climate is subtropical and has distinct seasons, ranging from 1-6°C in Winter and of 24-30°C in Summer.



The Hubei mountains (photo from Panoramio.com)

On to the teas:

  1. Yangxian (Yixing) black tea — a black specialty tea produced in the Yixing area of Jiangsu. The leaves are the standard of a bud or a bud and two leaves and are harvested between the Ching Ming Festival and the Guyu Festival. They are then withered, rolled, oxidized, and dried. The liquid is a brilliant red and fairly transparent but can get cloudy as it cools. The aroma is fresh and chestnutty, and the taste is mellow, brisk, and a bit sweet in the aftertaste.
  2. Yihong Gongfu tea — another black specialty tea produced in the Hefeng, Changyang, Enshi, Yichang Country of Hubei. The leaves are the standard of a bud or a bud and two leaves and are harvested between the Ching Ming Festival and the Guyu Festival. They are then withered, rolled, oxidized, and dried. The liquid is a brilliant red and fairly transparent but can get cloudy as it cools. The aroma is fresh and the taste is mellow, brisk, and a bit sweet.
  3. Dengcun green tea — a green specialty tea produced in Dengcun Village of Yichang City. The growing climate there is ideal, with mild temperatures, plenty of rain, and rich soil. The fresh bud and leaf pairs are harvested during the Chun Ming Festival. They are then fixed (to stop oxidizing), rolled, shaped, baked, and stir dried. They retain their selenium, zinc, and other trace elements and amino acids, aromatic substances, and water extracts, making them deemed one of the more healthful teas. They steep up a lovely bright yellow green liquid with a mellow and sweet taste.
  4. Wufeng Mao Jian tea — a green high mountain specialty tea produced in Caihua Village of Wufeng Tujia Country. The climate is perfect for tea growing, like the Dengcun tea above. The fresh bud and leaf pairs are harvested during the Chun Ming Festival. They are then fixed (to stop oxidizing), rolled, shaped, baked, and stir dried. They retain their selenium, zinc, and other trace elements, and amino acids, aromatic substances, and water extracts, making them deemed as a more healthful tea. They steep a liquid that is clear and bright with a mellow, fresh, brisk, and sweet taste.

You may have to hunt a bit to find these teas. But they will be worthwhile.

About Janice and Stephen Shelton

Purveyors of Premium Teas
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